Posts for: November, 2015

TheremaybemoretothatToothachethatSuddenlyStopsAching

If a pain you’ve been feeling goes away, you might believe the problem that caused it is gone too. But that doesn’t mean it has, especially with a tooth. An excruciating toothache that suddenly stops should still be examined. Here’s why.

Tooth decay often works its way into a tooth’s innermost layer, the pulp, which contains bundles of nerves and other tissue. The infection attacks the nerves, which send pain signals to the brain. As the infection persists, though, the nerves will eventually die and will no longer be capable of sending pain signals — hence the “mysterious” end of your toothache.

Although the pain has stopped, the infection is very much active in the tooth and will continue to work its way through the root canals to the jaw. And ultimately, the pain will return as the infection invades the bone.

But there’s good news: a tooth in this condition can be saved with a procedure known as root canal therapy. We drill a small hole in the tooth to access the pulp, usually through the biting surface of back teeth or in the rear in front teeth. Once inside the pulp chamber, we clean out the infected and dead tissue. We then fill the empty pulp chamber and the root canals with a special filling and seal the access hole. In a few weeks the tooth receives a life-like crown to further protect it from re-infection and fracture years later.

A straightforward root canal treatment can be performed by a general dentist. If there are complications like a complex root canal network, however, then the skills and specialized equipment of an endodontist (a specialist in root canals) may be needed.

A root canal treatment resolves the real cause of a toothache that suddenly stopped, as well as puts an end to future pain and infection related to the tooth. More importantly, it can save your tooth and add many more years to its life.

If you would like more information on tooth pain, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “A Severe Toothache.”


GiancarloStantonGetsMajor-LeagueMouthProtection

For major-league slugger Giancarlo Stanton, 2014 was a record-breaking year. After the baseball season ended, he signed a 13-year, $325 million contract with the Miami Marlins — the biggest deal in sports history. But earlier that same year, Stanton suffered one of the worst accidents in baseball: He was hit in the face by an 88-mph fastball, sustaining multiple fractures, lacerations, and extensive dental damage.

After the accident, Stanton didn’t play for the remainder of the season. But now he’s back in Spring Training… and he’s got a not-so-secret weapon to help protect him against another injury: A custom-made face guard designed to absorb impacts and keep him from suffering further trauma.

As sports fans, we’re glad that Stanton was able to overcome his injury and get back in the game. As dentists, we’d like to remind you that you don’t have to be a major-league player to feel the harmful effects of a sports injury — and you don’t have to look far to find a way to protect yourself. In fact, you can get a custom-made mouthguard right here at the dental office.

Mouthguards have a long tradition in sports like football, boxing, and hockey. But did you know that far more Americans are injured every year playing “non-collision” sports like basketball, baseball — and even bicycling? And it doesn’t take a major-league fastball to cause a dental injury: The highest incidence of sports-related dental injuries occurs in 15-to-18-year-old males. In fact, about one-third of all dental injuries among children stem from various types of sports activities. These injuries may result in countless hours being lost from school and work, and cost significant sums for treatment and restoration.

Mouthguards have a proven track record in reducing dental and facial injuries: They are capable of absorbing the energy of a blow to the mouth, and dissipating it in a way that prevents damage to facial structures and teeth. But not all mouthguards are created equal: Custom-fabricated mouthguards, which are produced from an exact model of your mouth made right here in the dental office, offer by far the best protection. They fit better and safeguard the teeth more fully than any off-the-shelf or “boil-and-bite” type can. Plus, they’re more comfortable to wear. And let’s face it: No mouth guard can protect your teeth if you don’t wear it.

What’s more, some recent studies indicate that custom-made mouthguards may offer significant protection against concussion. An increasing awareness of the dangers that concussion may pose to athletes is one more reason why we recommend custom-made mouthguards to active people and their families.

To get his face guard, Giancarlo Stanton reportedly went to a specialist sporting-goods manufacturer in Illinois, and paid around $1,000. But you can get a custom-made mouthguard for yourself or your loved ones right at our office for a fraction of that price. And the peace of mind it can give you is… priceless.

If you have questions about custom-made mouthguards, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “An Introduction to Sports Injuries & Dentistry” and “Athletic Mouthguards.”


November 01, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants   diabetes  
DentalImplantsandDiabetes

Today, dental implants are an increasingly popular option for replacing lost teeth — an issue faced by many older Americans. It’s not hard to see why these high-tech prosthetic teeth are preferred: They look, “feel” and function just like natural teeth… and with proper care they can last the rest of your life. Unfortunately, many people who could benefit from implants also face an additional health problem: diabetes, a metabolic disease that can affect many different parts of the body, sometimes severely.  Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to nerve and tissue damage, and may adversely impact your oral health. So if you have diabetes, does it mean you won’t be able to get dental implants? 

The short answer is no — but there are some considerations that diabetics (and their health care providers) need to keep in mind. For example, it has been demonstrated that wounds in diabetics tend to heal more slowly, and are more prone to infection than those in non-diabetics. Also, people with diabetes sometimes experience a chronic inflammatory response, which can eventually lead to tissue damage or other problems.

Because the placement of dental implants requires minor surgery, dentists and researchers have questioned whether people with diabetes are good candidates for implants. Now there’s encouraging news: Several recent studies have come to the conclusion that many diabetics can indeed undergo an implant procedure without undue risk.

One key consideration is how well an individual can control his or her blood glucose levels. Researchers have found that diabetics with good blood glucose control, those with poor glucose control, and non-diabetics all have similar implant success rates (above 95%). However, in diabetics with poor glucose control, more time may be needed for the jawbone to heal in the area where the implant procedure was done. That doesn’t by any means rule out the placement of a dental implant — but it does mean that special considerations apply to individuals in this situation.

So if you are considering an implant procedure but have trouble controlling your blood glucose levels, ask us how we can help. Just remember that in most cases, having diabetes doesn’t mean you won’t be able to enjoy the benefits of dental implants. If you have additional questions, contact us or schedule an appointment.




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Merrell Family Dentistry

(828) 692-1210
713 Oakland St Hendersonville, NC 28791-3647